Action 9, a magazine of topical news produced by and for the members of 9RQR. First published [twice!] in December 1976 it has been produced with, some significant gaps, to the present day.

Either some years had no publications or we have large gaps in our collection.
If anyone can add additional information, perhaps even provide issues for the 'missing' years it would be much appreciated.

We are missing years…
  • 1986 ~ 1990
  • 1998 ~ 1999
  • 2004
  • 2008
  • 2013
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The first issue was due to be released in October 1976 but the CO [LtCol Noel Williams] did not like our initial effort , or the cover we selected, and demanded that we 'try again'.

After much trial and effort we got the 'official' First Issue out in December 1976 with S/Sgt Graham Hale, the Battalion Pay Sgt, moved to page 3.
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Cover Photo-
APC action, Camp 1976. Pte Graham Gee [right] and L/Cpl 'Fish' Fisher of Support Company testing communications.


From The CO’s Desk

This is the first edition of a Battalion newspaper which will be published each quarter with the aim of helping to bridge the communication gap which invariably develops within any organisation which rapidly increases in size and which in the case of 9 ROR, is increased by the geographic spread of our sub-units. ‘Action 9” does not replace Routine Orders and other methods of communication; rather, it will be a means of promulgating news of general information regarding the men, women, activities and equipment which together form the life of our Battalion.

I hope that all soldiers of the 9 RQR will see ‘Action 9” as being THEIR NEWSLETTER and that many will contribute to its contents.

I believe that in this, the first edition of 'Action 9’1 it is appropriate that I briefly review the past year and look ahead to events which will occur in the next six months.
During the 1975/76 training period, the strength of 9 RQR increased to 510 personnel, 82.8% of unit strength attended a period of continuous training of at /east two weeks duration and the Battalions retention rate during each quarter ranged from 85.2% to 92.9°/0. These are significant achievements of which all ranks can feel justifiably proud as it is the contribution of every member of a team which leads to success.

It was particularly pleasing to note during the July camp, the rapidity with which individuals and minor sub-units could be moulded into an effective company group, as it is our capacity to do this which is the ultimate test of the efficiency of our training.

Finally in this brief review, I must commend all members of the Battalion for our excellent safety record. I believe our training during the period was realistic but as it should be, the unit did not sustain one serious injury during training activities.

Our prospects for 1976/1977 are good. The Battalion has retained its unit identity following the reorganisation of the Army Reserve, although we have been restricted numerically to three rifle companies; we already know in detail the concept of our 1977 camp and can plan accordingly; many of the financial and other administrative difficulties which applied during 1975/1976 have been relaxed.

I am confident that during the period from October 1976 to April 1977, our strength will increase to a sufficiently high /eve/ to permit the Battalion to have four rifle companies. This should be one of our aims and when we achieve it, 9 RQR will be the only Army Reserve Infantry Battalion in Australia i'n this category. I have no doubt that the keys to the achievement of our aims are imaginative training, good administration, effective leadership and allied to all of these, a continuation of the policy that only men and women who are prepared to soldier efficiently, are retained in the Battalion.

I hope that our soldiering in the months ahead, will be both enjoyable and satisfying.

N.T.J. WILLIAMS
Lieutenant Colonel
Commanding Officer

Cover Photo-
An unidentified soldier takes a meal break on Exercise 'BIG STEP'

From The CO’s Desk


Our camp during March, 1977 was very successful. All groups swiftly moulded themselves into effective teams and throughout the Battalion, individuals showed enthusiasm in learning or revising the skills and techniques of soldiering, The Battalion again has shown that Army Reserve soldiers have the knowledge and ability to quickly form a viable force in a time of national emergency. I thank all unit members for the contribution which they made to the success of the Camp.

Since 1st August, 1976, 81.6 per cent of the posted strength of 9RQR has attended a minimum period of two weeks full time training. This is a high percentage, particularly in a period of time when employment difficulties exist.

Also of interest is the fact that our strength as at 16th April, 1977 was 489 all ranks, with approximately 100 additional personnel still to be attested following our recent recruiting activities. An examination of our numerical strength in greater detail, $l10w$ that we suffered a loss of 38 soldiers in 1974, a gain of 54 in 1975 and a net increase of 128 in 1976. These are pleasing figures and to the best of my knowledge, 9 Fl.D.Fl. continues to be dee largest unit in the Australian Army Reserve.

I hope that all members of the Battalion enjoy reading “Action 9"and that our soldiering in 1977/78 will be as successful and enjoyable as it was in 1976/77.

N.T.J. WILLIAMS
Lieutenant Colonel
Commanding Officer

Cover Photo-
One of the foundation members of the 9RQR Pipes and Drums

From The CO’s Desk

There are three matters which I wish to mention briefly in this Edition of "Action 9".

The first is the fact that 9 RGB is under consideration for reclassification as a Type A Battalion, that is a unit which has entitlements for equipment and personnel based upon a six company structure, not five companies as at the present time.

Such a reclassification would be of considerable value both to the Battalion as a whole and to individual members, as increased flexibility in our training would become possible, particularly within the northern companies.

Our effective strength is the main criteria which will influence future decisions in respect of the Battalion’s classification and I am confident that we will attain Type A status, this belief being based upon our present strength and our proven growth pattern over the past three years.
Following is a table showing the strength of `9 ROR on nominated dates since 1 January, 1974: ‘
(A) 1 January 1974: 330
(B) 1 January 1975: 306
(C) 1 January 1976: 370
(D) 1 January 1977: 487

During the first seven months of 1977, our strength further increased from 487 to 539 personnel and this growth continues, though at a slower rate than in past months of The above situation is most pleasing and is made more so by the fact that during 1975/1976, 82.8% of the Battalion attended a camp of continuous training of at least two weeks(
duration. During 1976/1977, the statistic was 95.3% of total strength.
I am aware of the employment difficulties which some members of the Battalion are experiencing at the present time.
Their efforts "to soldier on” do not pass unnoticed and I hope that they continue to obtain considerable personal satisfaction from their membership of 9 ROR.

The second matter is to share with you some outline details of a revised training system which will become effective from 1 November 1977.
Under the new system, our training activities will” be divided only into the categories of Unit Training and Additional Training. The classification of parades as obligatory, voluntary or alternate will no longer apply.

All members of the Army Reserve will be expected to undertake a minimum of 26 days and a maximum of 33 days Unit Training during each year. Within 9 RQB, these days will be allocated as follows:
(A) 14 days to a camp for continuous training.
(B) 18 days to two-day bivouacs conducted in the field on the basis of one each month, excluding November, December and January.
(C) 1 day to training conducted in Depots during December.

In addition to the above training, individuals may be granted approval to participate in Additional Training activities up to a maximum of 67 days per year; however, it would be most unlikely for a large number of people to be involved to this degree. The type of activities which could qualify for approval are schools and courses, NCO training, participation in ABA exercises and essential unit and sub-unit administrative tasks.

Within the Battalion, training will continue to be conducted on every Tuesday night excluding the months of December and January and a limited number of other occasions when activities will not be held. Parades will constitute Additional Training and will be of three hours duration.

One further change which will occur in our training programme is that on several weekends during each year, 50%of our sub-units will parade on dates which are different from the remaining half of the Battalion. This system will permit the maximum utilisation of stores and should enable us to achieve greater flexibility in the range of our activities l am very anxious to hear your views in respect of the new system and I ask that these opinions to be given to your section and platoon commanders.

The final matter which I wish to raise concerns the publication of ”Action 9". It is pleasing to note the number of articles which are being received for publication in "Action 9”, as without this type of involvement, the newsletter will lose much of its significance and will cease to be an effective means of communication between our widely dispersed sub-units. l ask that members of the Battalion continue to forward their contributions to Major Newland, who, for the immediate future, will continue to be responsible for editorial work.

N.T.J. Williams
Lieutenant Colonel
Commanding Officer

Cover photo:
L to R; Ptes Hawkins, Ansell and Deaves looking at a sword taken by A Coy 9th Moreton at Bougainville - Presented by Maj A Beech.

From The CO’s Desk

1977 has been another successful year for the Battalion. This situation is reflected in many ways, but probably the most tangible is the fact that as at 31st October, 1977, our total strength was 541 personnel. I am confident that in the near future we will attain the status of a six company Battalion, but irrespective of the out-
come of that decision, it is my intention to retain Bundaberg and lVlaryborough as separate sub-units, with the platoon based at Gympie continuing to form part of the Maryborough company. `
With effect from 1st November, 1977, our new system of training came into effect.

The basis of the new system is that all members of the Battalion will be required during each year to attend a period of 14 days continuous training and to participate in a minimum of six bivouacs out of a total of nine weekend bivouacs which will be scheduled for conduct during the year. In addition, training will be conducted on one Saturday during December, in order to carry out essential end of year activities.

Sub-unit training programmes will be so planned that our resources will be concentrated to achieve effective sub--unit training during the above 33 days and a maximum attendance at these parades is expected. In addition, selected members of the Battalion may volunteer to undertake additional training of a specialist nature which will be conducted on Tuesday nights and a limited number of weekends.

There are three other matters which I wish to mention briefly in this edition of "Action 9”.

The first concerns the 1978 Annual Camp which will be conducted from 6th to 19th March, 1978, this 14 day period of training being preceded by a bivouac on 4th and 5th l\/larch. With this degree of advance notice, it is to be hoped that attendance will be high, particularly as for the first time since 1975, the Battalion will be concentrated as a unit identity.

The second matter is in respect of the need for economy and cost effectiveness during the months ahead. It is an unfortunate fact of life that restrictions have been imposed upon the usage of such items as ammunition; however, imaginative training and good management will minimise the effects of these restrictions. We all must be encouraged to avoid wastefulness and to ensure that our equipment is properly cared for and maintained; everyone must become cost conscious and to this end it is worth noting the costs of some high usage items:

(A) 1 man ration packs $ 3.26
(B) Smoke grenades $23.00
(C) 7.62 mm blank rounds $ 0.12
(D) 81 mm mortar HE rounds $99.00

I am confident that with adequate and imaginative planning, our training need not suffer unduly because of the economic restrictions which have been placed upon us.

Finally, it is with considerable personal pleasure that I extend best wishes for Christmas and 1978 to all members of the Battalion and to those who support their endeavours to serve as effective members of 9 ROR.

N.T.J. Williams
Lieutenant Colonel,
Commanding Officer

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Taken from the Jan 79 Action 9, page 3, when we attended the All Arms Air Defence Course at the School of Artillery, North Head, Sydney.
[One advantage of being the WebMaster is that I can slip in some photo's when I feel like it.]
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Cover photo:
The Officer in Charge of Hervey Bay Police and Marshall of the Town of Hervey Bay, Sgt Des Rodgers, as he issued the Challenge to the Office Commanding D Coy, Maj Clive Franks at the entraince to the Town.

Editorial
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Cover photo:
MG Course held at D Coy training Maryborough and Tin Can Bay.
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Cover photo:
The standard of food, obvious from the photo, was excellent at LWC.

From the CO's Desk
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Cover photo:
Capt John Lefel, QM, and Lt Stacey holding up the RSL Challenge Trophy which was won by the Bn shooting team.


From the 2IC's Desk
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Action 9